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believe ultimately we are all energy. energy keeps changing. ultimately it is a connectedness and it is strange because it seems that society is promoting or nurturing this kind of ostracized existence. people are very much in their own little world. a funny time. i am sure any time you live-in you consider it funny. lots have changed and it will keep doing that. it is a matter of embracing it or not. there is a fascinating point. we could have a show about this notion. there are so many go, they haveo develop a sense of individuality. the older i things to believe. the movie is about that notion. you're trying to raise this boy who is trying to figure out what to believe in. regard to your own children, how in a world where there are so many things to believe and aside from your character, how do you direct and guide question might-direct and direct and guide? >> i allow them to have the their own ideas and nurture and foster that sense of following their own instincts. my kids are 5 and 2. start to pop-on up. one of us will answer and the village other and go, is that ok? it
to be produced by coal burning power plants, about 70% or so of china's energy's needs are met. a huge amount of pollution in the north of the country. >> as you say, the facts are stark. how much alarm hasn't raised? >> interestingly, we just checked all the major news they aren china, and not during this report from what we have seen. a few years back, a world bank issued a report in which about three quarters of a million people were dying prematurely every year because of china's pollution. according to reports from that time, figures were suppressed. why? the authorities here did deeply nervous when numbers come into the equation. they know there's a huge amount of public anger over this issue, and they don't want to flame public anger further by mentioning the numbers. that appears to be what is happening here. >> i imagine as we did the city of london, except pollution to be just the case and that is what you get by living in the city. this provision with coal, i presume it is done with the best intentions. but one wonders what can be done about it now? >> that is interesting. this pol
have no energy to look for her anymore. i don't know where to go. >> an anguished crowd bearing images of loved ones quickly gathered around us. bilquis' daughter shahinoor is among those missing. many here gave dna samples in hopes a match could be found with someone buried. so far, they said, no word and no compensation. >> translator: i had two sons and a daughter-in-law working on the second floor. we got the bodies of my older son and daughter-in-law but they haven't found my younger son. >> reporter: i don't know about my future. i have no strength. and it is difficult for me to move. i pray to allah. i want a job. i need to start again. >> apparel makers, high fashion and bargain names alike, have been lured here by the low wages. the minimum wage is just $37 a month. in barely two decades, bangladesh has become second only to china in garment manufacturing. but all this has come at huge expense to workers, says nazma enforcement of safety rules and the suppression of labor unions, issues the u.s. government cited last week as it suspended trade privileges for some bangladeshi i
america, not only on military matters, but energy and oil matters. your response? >> i think he is trouble hearing us and we have to end the interview because we're coming to the end of the hour. we want to think foreign minister ricardo patiÑo. our interview with sharif abdel kouddous will be on after the broadcast and will be posted at democracynow.org. democracy now! is looking for feedback from people who appreciate the closed captioning. email your comments to outreach@democracynow.org or mail them to democracy now! p.o. box 693, new york, ny 10013. tavis: it has taken a backseat to the bloodshed in cairo. here to discuss john kerry's role as a piece worker is tohael oren, the ambassador the u.s..
'm not worried about the city. here's why. this city has a vitality and an energy that manages to be self-sustaining. the political leadership is important so while i wait, as many people do, to see if any of the mayoral candidates will emerge to be strong enough, thoughtful enough to chart a course economically, socially, politically that will carry us forward. i'm not worried. i think people rise to the occasion in public life. i think the city is sort of indigenous power, capital base, intellectual base, immigrant community. therefore so many factors that come together to keep the city going. john sexton who i think one of the smartest people out there said it used to be fire, finance and real estate that were reviewed as the essential industries. intellectual, cultural educational institutions that then bring in the people, the human capital that today in this world defines success or failure makes the city a magnet. that is why the city's pulse continues to be as vibrant as it is. yes, we will miss mike but four years from now, two years from now, i hope... we know one of these candi
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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